Patron: Her Excellency The Right Honourable Dame Patsy Reddy, GNZM, QSO, Governor-General of New Zealand

Recent Political Developments in Japan and its Implications on Foreign Policy

Guest Speaker: Professor Toshihiro Nakayama
Professor of American Politics and Foreign Policy at the Faculty of Policy Management at Keio University Shonan Fujisawa Campus

Event Date: Wednesday 30th August 2017
Event Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm

Event Location: Bell Gully
Level 21, 171 Featherston Street, Wellington.

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Professor Toshihiro Nakayama

Professor Toshihiro Nakayama

Toshihiro Nakayama is a Professor of American Politics and Foreign Policy at the Faculty of Policy Management at Keio University Shonan Fujisawa Campus (SFC). He is also an Adjunct Fellow at the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA).

He was a Special Correspondent for the Washington Post at the Far Eastern Bureau (1993-94), Special Assistant at the Permanent Mission of Japan to the United Nations in New York (1996-98), Senior Research Fellow at The Japan Institute of International Affairs (2004-06), Associate Professor at Tsuda College (2006-10), and Professor at Aoyama Gakuin University (2010-14). He was also a CNAPS Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution (2005-06). Dr Nakayama received his M.A. (1993) and Ph.D. (2001) from School of International Politics, Economy and Business (SIPEB), Aoyama Gakuin University.

He has written two books and numerous articles on American politics, foreign policy and international relations. He appears regularly on Japanese media. Writes a monthly column for Japan News. Recipient of Nakasone Yasuhiro Award (Incentive Award) in 2014.

ABSTRACT

For the past several years, Japan has enjoyed a strong and stable political leadership under Prime Minister Abe. No, signs of populist surge nor extreme distrust in government could be detected in Japan. He has navigated Japan in a dangerous part of the world rather successfully. He has tackled many of the pressing foreign and security policy agendas which previous leaders could not. However, there are signs that trust in his leadership seems to be getting weaker. What are the foreign policy implications of all this? The talk would evaluate his foreign policy accomplishments and consider where Japan would go from here.

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